Health & care of Dachshund
August 20, 2019
History of Dachshunds
August 20, 2019

Dachshunds personality, children and other pets

Personality

The Dachshund is described as clever, lively, and courageous to the point of rashness. He’s bred for perseverance, which is another way of saying that he can be stubborn. Dachshunds have a reputation for being entertaining and fearless, but what they want most is to cuddle with their people. For many Dachshund people, this characteristic outweighs having to deal with the breed’s insistence on having his own way. The Dachshund personality can also vary with coat type. Because the wirehaired Dachshunds have terrier in their background, they can be mischievous troublemakers. Longhairs are calm and quiet, and Smooths have a personality that lies somewhere in between. Some Mini Dachshunds can be nervous or shy, but this isn’t correct for the breed. Avoid puppies that show these characteristics.

Temperament is affected by a number of factors, including heredity, training, and socialization. Puppies with nice temperaments are curious and playful, willing to approach people and be held by them. Choose the middle-of-the-road puppy, not the one who’s beating up his littermates or the one who’s hiding in the corner. Always meet at least one of the parents-usually the mother is the one who’s available-to ensure that they have nice temperaments that you’re comfortable with. Meeting siblings or other relatives of the parents is also helpful for evaluating what a puppy will be like when he grows up.

Like every dog, Dachshunds need early socialization-exposure to many different people, sights, sounds, and experiences-when they’re young. Socialization helps ensure that your Dachshund puppy grows up to be a well-rounded dog. Enrolling him in a puppy kindergarten class is a great start. Inviting visitors over regularly, and taking him to busy parks, stores that allow dogs, and on leis.

 

Children And Other Pets

Dachshunds are good with children in their own family if introduced to them early. They may not be as fond of your children’s friends, so supervise playtime.

With his long back, the Dachshund can be easily injured if he’s not handled properly. Make it a rule that young children can only hold or pet the Dachshund if they’re sitting on the floor. Always teach children how to approach and touch dogs, and always supervise any interactions between dogs and young children to prevent any biting or ear or tail pulling on the part of either party. Teach your child never to approach any dog while he’s sleeping or eating or to try to take the dog’s food away. No dog should ever be left unsupervised with a child.

Dachshunds get along well with other pets, especially if they’re introduced to them in puppyhood. With their bold, domineering personalities, they may well be top dog.

 

Source: DogTime.com